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Sven

Whatcha reading?

Pretty simple: just what you're reading and what you think about it.

 

Lots of Victorian literature for my course (George Eliot, Henry James, Joseph Conrad etc.), but just finished Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go after he picked up the Nobel. In equal parts melancholic, touching, and completely tragic. I read The Remains of The Day  after I saw the film, but I prefer NLMG now. 

Tucker933 likes this

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Summerhill, by Kevin Frane. Pretty damned decent science-fiction. 

Edited by ST34MF0X
PopeTX28 likes this

Founder and current project lead of the TiaraCE project.

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Deadpool Kills Deadpool (Comic written by Cullen Bunn)


"It's massive. Probably hard to tell from the picture.                                 "If you're up for it. You've done it before, right?"           

But it broke so now I'm using a puny one..." - ShikuTeshi 2017                                                                          -Tucker933 2017

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bumping because I don't want to start a new topic.

 

Read Neil Gaiman's new Norse Mythology, which was so addictive I had to read it in one sitting. Also just finished Stoner by John Williams, which is equally depressing, profound, candid, and did I mention depressing? Would recommend if you like to intermittent fits of crying.

 

About 1/3 of the way through The Shadow of the Sun by Ryszard Kapuscinki. Somehow feels a tad dated in the storm of today's racial politics, but insightful and forthright about the issues and experiences he personally went through. Some fantastic insight about Ghana's independence, pan-africanism and the ensuing effects on the concept of 'Africa', which is, of course, a massive misnomer and generalization that still seems to be relevant today. Also gave me a good idea for a short story.

 

C'mon, lit nerds. Feed me books.

 

Sunstriker7 likes this

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This is an awesome thread. I'm glad you bumped it; I had no idea it existed.

 

Everything I've read by Neil Gaiman was absolutely phenomenal and I had a very hard time not reading it in one sitting. I'll have to check this one out. Is it anything like American Gods?

 

Currently I'm reading Necronomicon: The Wanderings of Alhazred. It's a grimoire that follows the wanderings of the necromancer Alhazred on his search for ancient magics. It features many of the monsters and dimensions mysteriously referenced in H.P. Lovecraft's mythos. Alhazred and the grimoire itself are also referred to a lot in Lovecraft's work. It's written by Donald Tyson and is an excellent tie-in read for any Lovecraft fan.

Sven likes this

Kavawuvi: one of these days these glutes are gonna squawk all over you

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On 6/21/2018 at 3:50 AM, Sunstriker7 said:

-snip-

Not really that much all like American Gods. It has that instantly identifiable Gaiman storytelling touch, but the subject matter is so different and told in a rather playful tone - stark contrast from American Gods & Anansi Boys, really. Colourful characters and a clear sense of mythological 'rules' that govern the world, if that makes any sense to you.

 

I haven't read any Lovecraft, unfortunately. What would you recommend as a starter? I've seen his influence in so many other works, and as a progenitor of amazing horror I respect the hell out of him, but it's never been something that immediately attracted me.

 

Finished The Shadow of the Sun. Started reading Victorian Duke: the Life of Hugh Lupus Grosvenor by Gervas Huxley, who I'm actually a direct descendant of on my mother's side, so it is a bit of a vanity project lol. Also trudging through some pertinent sections of Herman Kahn's On Thermonuclear War for a novella I'm working on. Real tome, to be honest, but he approaches mass casualty statistics like an economist. Depressing stuff.

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