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Kalipsan

Tennessee Lawmaker makes video to show how easy it is to buy/sell guns

So a Tennessee lawmaker made a video where he bought a long-gun and then decided to set up a lemonade stand, selling lemonade and his new rifle. It's actually kind of hilarious. 

 

 

What do you think about the laws?


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Anyone with half an ounce of common sense knows the gun laws are far too loose in this country.

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I... could be wrong but... I don't think that's an AK-47.

 

But yes he has a point, I don't really understand why there are places with no background checks. It just holds you off from buying a gun 2-5 days, and if the check isn't done by then the gun can be sold (in most states) anyways. Really the only reason someone wouldn't want this is for malicious intent. If you have something on your record but have amends for it already, chances are something like that is printed on a legal document somewhere.

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10 hours ago, Vuthakral said:

I... could be wrong but... I don't think that's an AK-47.

 

That's what I was thinking :P


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Posted (edited)

On 4/12/2017 at 0:33 PM, Vuthakral said:

I... could be wrong but... I don't think that's an AK-47.

 

But yes he has a point, I don't really understand why there are places with no background checks. It just holds you off from buying a gun 2-5 days, and if the check isn't done by then the gun can be sold (in most states) anyways. Really the only reason someone wouldn't want this is for malicious intent. If you have something on your record but have amends for it already, chances are something like that is printed on a legal document somewhere.

 

It's not, it's a modified Saiga which is a sporterized version of the AK series platform. That particular platform has been modified back into a tactical setup. However, our good friend here is looking at committing a purchase with the intent of resale, which is a violation of federal law.

 

Unless the sale is occurring within a state that allows a private sale between two individuals, then the sale requires a background check by state law. States that allow private sales limit them to between state residents only, with verification of state residency via state ID or driver license. Some states require private sales be done through an FFL for a cost of $25+ per firearm. 

 

Under federal law, if an FFL doesn't receive a return call from FBI NICS pertaining to a delayed 4473 within three days, he/she can sell the firearm, but if the background check comes back denied the FFL must notify FBI NICS and the State Police of the sale so the firearm can be recovered.

 

I'm not too keen on the whole "nothing to hide" argument. It is akin to arguing that civil asset forfeiture is completely reasonable because "you have nothing to hide". Establishing a federal law that requires all private sales be process through an FFL will not stop or slow "gun violence" at all. An excellent example of this is California. California suffers more murders and shootings than some states with less restrictive gun laws. 

 

Criminals aren't scouring the internet looking for a private seller, they're visiting the guy down the street who's selling automatic weapons and controlled devices out of the trunk of his car, that he's bought by the case load from the cartels or arms dealers who're trafficking them out of Eastern Europe or South America.

 

Even if California like legislation were established across the country, it's not going to stop crime. Omar Mateen, the Pulse Nightclub Shooter, possessed a concealed carry license, was bonded to carry firearms as a security guard, had passed psychological testing, passed a background check for employment, and had been under FBI investigation in 2013 and 2014 for connections with terrorism, but was removed from the Terrorist Screening Database, then Mateen was reported to the FBI by an employee of Lotus Gunworks an FFL in Florida when he tried to purchase 1,000 rounds of 9mm and body armor, but was denied because of his suspicious demeanor. Mateen legally purchased a SIG MPX and Glock 17 that he used to murder 49 patrons of the club. 

 

Then we have the purposeful action by the ATF to proliferate firearms through illegal straw sales using legally established FFLs and mentally defective individuals to track them with the end result of arresting cartel bosses. The "operations" lead to no arrests of cartel members, the proliferation of over 2,000 firearms into the arms of cartels of which only 710 have been recovered, a BCP agent killed with one of the proliferated rifles, and the FFL owners whom the ATF coerced were arrested and charged. Then the entire fiasco was covered up, the lead agent promoted and sent to the Chicago Field Office...that is until a fed up field agent blow the whistle which resulted in multiple Congressional investigations blowing the lid off the who thing, showing the AG knew of the existence of the operations and resulted in the President covering the ass of the AG by invoking Executive Privilege, and the Director of the ATF and Arizona AG resign.

 

Edited by Wojtek
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