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Kavawuvi

Windows 10

29 posts in this topic
This seems specious to me. I've not heard of vulnerabilities in the P2P system.

 

This. P2P doesn't just start fishing for pieces of data because someone is pushing. P2P verifies the integrity of a download via a hash check against a source. If something isn't correct, it will re-download the pieces it needs.

 

Lulz @ not trusting Microsoft, but trusting whoever developed "Ultimate Windows Tweaker 4" to run their mystery-meat program as administrator on your machine.

 

And also this. You cannot trust software you did not completely write yourself.

Kavawuvi likes this

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This. P2P doesn't just start fishing for pieces of data because someone is pushing. P2P verifies the integrity of a download via a hash check against a source. If something isn't correct, it will re-download the pieces it needs.

That, and using a hash also verifies that the code has originated from Microsoft rather than a third party, as their updates would have to be signed. The only way to get around this without having malware already installed on the computer trying to update would be to somehow get Microsoft's private key, whether that be somehow stealing it from Microsoft or hoping it gets leaked somehow, or spend potentially hundreds of years (or more) with the best supercomputers in the world brute forcing it.

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Datacapfag reporting in.  I'd just like to add that as someone who is extremely cautious of daily data usage, I have seen no noticeable increase in idle data usage if any compared to Windows 8.1.  Of course, I have the pro edition of 10 and enabled deferred updates, as well as telling Windows that I have a metered connection.  I'm pretty sure the metered connection option is available in all versions so just enable that even if you don't have a metered connection.  If Windows is still using noticeable amounts of bandwidth then you're either on dial-up or have third party software eating it up.

WaeV and Kavawuvi like this

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I am currently running Windows 7 Professional 64-bit.  I have been debating on weather to update to Windows 10 for some time and I am not really that convinced.  For the time being, I have moved the installer files for Windows 10 on to a USB drive as it was taking the better part of 6GB on my SSD.  My system wont have any trouble running it at all.

 

My specs:

24GB DDR3 @ 1600MHz, 256GB SSD, Intel Core i7 4710MQ @ 2.5GHz 4 cores/8 threads (although CPU-Z often says it is running at 3.2GHz) and I have an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M (2GB).  I am sure Windows 10 will run just fine on this system, but I am more inclined to stay with Windows 7 for the time being because of the horror stories I have heard.  In any event, I prefer Windows 7 anyway.  As for the reason I purchased Windows 7 Professional instead of sticking with Home Premium which originally came with this system, it is because Home Premium wont allow you to use more than 16GB of RAM, which is just silly.  I had no choice but to upgrade to Professional to make use of the extra 8GB or it would sit there doing nothing, and I wasn't having that.  Even with 24GB of RAM in my laptop, I have still maxed it out on a few occasions, however, when I double the capacity on my SSD, I will add an 8GB swap file to effectively bring my RAM up to 32GB, that may make things easier.  Currently I dont have a swap file as I did not think I required it but clearly I may well do.  It may be that I decide to add a swap file of 40GB to effectively give myself 64GB, I know that its not real RAM, but it will help right?  I have always wanted a laptop with 32GB or even 64GB of RAM but the price of them is way out of my price range, and now I have to continue saving for my second visit to the U.S to do some more storm chasing.

 

I'm done rambling!  :)

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I am currently running Windows 7 Professional 64-bit.  I have been debating on weather to update to Windows 10 for some time and I am not really that convinced.  For the time being, I have moved the installer files for Windows 10 on to a USB drive as it was taking the better part of 6GB on my SSD.  My system wont have any trouble running it at all.

 

My specs:

24GB DDR3 @ 1600MHz, 256GB SSD, Intel Core i7 4710MQ @ 2.5GHz 4 cores/8 threads (although CPU-Z often says it is running at 3.2GHz) and I have an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 860M (2GB).  I am sure Windows 10 will run just fine on this system, but I am more inclined to stay with Windows 7 for the time being because of the horror stories I have heard.  In any event, I prefer Windows 7 anyway.  As for the reason I purchased Windows 7 Professional instead of sticking with Home Premium which originally came with this system, it is because Home Premium wont allow you to use more than 16GB of RAM, which is just silly.  I had no choice but to upgrade to Professional to make use of the extra 8GB or it would sit there doing nothing, and I wasn't having that.  Even with 24GB of RAM in my laptop, I have still maxed it out on a few occasions, however, when I double the capacity on my SSD, I will add an 8GB swap file to effectively bring my RAM up to 32GB, that may make things easier.  Currently I dont have a swap file as I did not think I required it but clearly I may well do.  It may be that I decide to add a swap file of 40GB to effectively give myself 64GB, I know that its not real RAM, but it will help right?  I have always wanted a laptop with 32GB or even 64GB of RAM but the price of them is way out of my price range, and now I have to continue saving for my second visit to the U.S to do some more storm chasing.

 

I'm done rambling!  :)

 

The minimum requirements for Windows 10 are the same as Windows 7 and Windows 8. Low-end computers should actually run somewhat better on Windows 10 than on Windows 7, actually.

 

According to your processor's specs in Intel ARK, you can use 32GB of non-ECC DDR3L (note the L) RAM with an i7-4710MQ. If your laptop is in good shape and you don't care about your warranty but just want more RAM, you're probably better off upgrading your laptop's RAM than actually buying a new laptop, unless your manufacturer did an Apple and solder the RAM onto the motherboard or made the RAM otherwise difficult to reach. Note that laptop RAM (SODIMM) is not the same as desktop RAM (usually DIMM, though Macs and NUCs use SODIMM too), and the RAM modules you need for 32GB will be dependent on the number of SODIMM slots in your laptop if you want to go through with this.

 

Windows uses a page file for swap space, and it's enabled by default. This page file is located on your boot partition, though you can move it onto another volume through your system properties if you need space on that drive for some reason. Most operating systems do something like this for if you happen to be exceeding the amount of RAM you have. Forcing this file to be bigger is not the same as (or even close to) giving yourself more RAM. While there are other reasons for why someone might want to do this (fragmentation is an example), the purpose of swap space is to make sure your programs don't crash if you use too much memory. In fact, if your system runs out of RAM and uses swap space, then you'll get a massive slowdown on programs that are using this swap space even if it's on an SSD. 


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I'll stick with Windows 7 for now thank you very much.

That seems to be the popular opinion here, and I don't blame anyone for sticking with something that already works fine, considering some of the negative points in Windows 10. Ideally, there should be the same or less cons in Windows 10 than in Windows 7. It shouldn't feel like you're sacrificing anything when you update.

Iggy likes this

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My sentiments exactly, my other PC has the free upgrade offer on it and occasionally I'm tempted to go for it but then the "if it ain't broke don't fix it" mentality kicks in.

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If you keep the Windows.old folder, you'll be able to roll back to Windows 7 if you don't like it.

The upgrade software itself is apparently broken for some people, so updating by itself is a risk. I've heard from several people as well as several actual sources that it can put your PC into an endless cycle of constant rebooting. Even if you can revert back to Windows 7, it won't do much good if your computer fails before even making it to Windows 10. This is exactly the things I worry about when major upgrades (and even minor upgrades) occur. 

 

This is probably incredibly unlikely to happen, as most people I know upgrade without a single hitch, and there's probably something wrong that they did. Maybe they clicked the wrong pixel on the update button or something.


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